Alex Tanous Foundation for Scientific Research Newsletter

The Light: November 2005

The Light: November 2005

"Beyond Coincidence": Sharing Stories About Alex

KILLED BY A TRAIN

When he (Alex) was 13, a woman whose son was serving in the armend forces approached young Tanous and asked if her boy would return from the war. Tanous predicted that he would but advised the woman she should warn her son to avoid corssing railroad tracks. the solider returned home safe and sound but a few days later was struck and killed by a train as he crossed a set of tracks.

 

Image Projection: As Seen By Different People

Image Projection: As Seen By Different People

"On Saturday night, Ocotber 25, 1969, shortly after midnight, while Dr. Alex Tanous and five other people and my husband were all talking in our living room, I turned my head over to say something to Mrs. Sylvia Allen and her husband and Mrs. Mary McKenzie, my eyes went to the wall in the corner. I saw the outline of the ship in light, a reproduction of the picture on the wall. I quickly took my eyes off it, as I was very frightenend at what I saw. My hands were shaking, I could not beleive what I was seeing so I looked again and it was still there. I wasn't going to say anything, but I just had to ask everyone if they had seen it.
Dr. Tanous then immediately asked me what I saw, and I told him. He said, "Yes I just projectd that picture onto the wall."
After that, starting across the top of another picture and going all around it was a wide band of light framing the picture. In the corner of the room, a wide band of light starting from the ceiling extended down to the floor, flashes of light making like frames were everywhere in that area. The left wall was quite dark and the opposite wall was very light. This went on from after midnight till almost 2 a.m. The band of light in the corner would not go away.
Dr. Tanous said, "I cannot turn it off." Until he got up from his chair, put his hands over his eyes and turned away from it, the light remained. After that, my fear had left me, and I was very amazed at all that had happended."

Very Sincerely,
Mrs. Mary L. Pawlowski
Portland, Maine

 

Lights Out

Once during a fund-raiser for an antidrug program in Machias, Maine, someone in the audience asked Dr. Tanous if he could put out all the lights in the high school auditorium. "I don't know," he replied, "but I'll give it a try." Alex stared at a glowing bulb, as if to draw energy from it. "Lights Out!" he commanded, and moments later the hall was ptich-black, and so were all the rooms in the school. For nearly a minute, there wasn't a burning light in the town of Machias- a total power failure. "Afterward," wrote Tanous, "I was interviewed by the local radio station. I could not explain waht happended. But I was sure I had caused it.
This happened on April 28, 1970